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Caregiver Resource Guide  

Last Updated: Oct 1, 2015 URL: Print Guide RSS Updates

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Any person who supports a patient during treatment is a caregiver, be that person the spouse, partner, sibling, son, daughter, or friend. Many other people, such as doctors, nurses, social workers, or counselors, also take part in caregiving. Communicating with your loved one and with your teammates will be a big part of your job. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or admit you’re not sure about something.

As a caregiver, your role will change over time. It will be a balancing act. You must decide when to do a lot and when to do a little. Above all, you must take care of yourself. This isn't always easy but keep your body and mind healthy so you can give the best care to the one you love. We hope this guide will help you, your team, and your loved one.


Information for Visitors

Visiting hours are 9 am - 9 pm, seven days a week, with some exceptions. Two visitors per patient are allowed in the room at any time. Children under age 10 may visit patient rooms under special circumstances. There should be only one child in a room at a time. To spend more time with children, you may use the solarium on your nursing floor.

For more information about visiting, including parking, meals and snacks, and wireless access, see, Visitor Information.



It is always helpful for a patient to have someone with them for their appointments and treatments. You can help by driving, keeping them company, listening, taking notes, and clarifying information told to them by the healthcare team.

For more information about what to expect at a first appointment, such as what to bring and who you and your loved one will meet, see our Patient Center.


In the Hospital

Here are some things things you can do for your loved one while he or she is in the hospital:

  • Keep them company, if they feel up to it. Sometimes, they may be tired or prefer to be alone.
  • Listen to, and keep track of, important information told to them by the doctors or nurses. Don't be afraid to speak up if you have a question or concern.
  • Go for walks with your loved one, if his or her condition allows. Before taking your loved one for a walk, check with the nurse to see if he or she is well enough to walk and good places to walk around.
  • The Relaxation Channel (#27) on the television is a great way to help them relax.
    • Sporting events, like Phillies, Eagles, and Flyers games, are not shown in patients' rooms. If that is important to either you or your loved one, you may want to bring in a radio and headphones.
  • Please inform your healthcare team of any cultural practices.
  • If loved one has had surgery, remind him or her to do coughing and deep breathing exercises and use the deep breathing device.
  • Wireless internet service is available throughout Fox Chase Cancer Center. No registration or password is required. On your laptop's list of available networks, select FCCCguest.
  • The Volunteer department has laptops available for patient use at certain times of the day. If you would like to use one of these laptops, ask the nurses. While you are at Fox Chase, you can use the computers in our Resource and Education Center or Talbot Library.
  • You may bring food from home. Please label any food with the patient's name, and give it to one of the nurses who can store it in the patient refrigerator on the unit.

Please keep in mind that the patient may have a roommate, so be respectful of their his or her needs.

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